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a decade, the u.s. military establishment has treated cyberspace as a domain of conflict, where it would need the capability to fend off attack or launch its own. that time is here, because someone sabotaged a top secret nuclear installation in iran with nothing more than a long string of computer code. >> we have entered into a new phase of conflict in which we use a cyberweapon to create physical destruction. [ticking] >> viktor bout, in my eyes, is one of the most dangerous men on the face of the earth. >> on the face of the earth? >> without a doubt. >> which is why the u.s. government launched an elaborate international sting to nab viktor bout. what makes bout so dangerous? and how did d.e.a. agents eventually grab him? the answers in our story later. [ticking] this is what espionage looks like. the man driving the car is gregg bergersen. he's a civilian analyst at the pentagon with one of the nation's highest security clearances. his companion is tai shen kuo, a spy for the people's republic of china. bergersen knew a secret that the chinese desperately wanted to know, and neither
in the face of increased hostility from the u.s. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. north korea is drawing global condemnation for a new underground nuclear test. the north korean government confirmed the test after seismic activity of 4.9 magnitude was picked up in the korean peninsula. north korea had vowed to conduct rocket launches and a u.s.-and declared test after the u.n. security council resolution tightened sanctions in response to rocket launch two months ago. in a statement, u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon condemned the test, calling it "deplorable" and "a clear and grave violation." the security council is holding an emergency session on north korea later today. two men have been charged in the shooting death of a 15-year-old girl struck by random gunfire just days after performing at president obama's inauguration. hadiya pendleton had recently returned from washington, where she performed with her school marching band during the inaugural festivities. she was laid to rest saturday at a f
that this u.s. launches these drone attacks against al qaeda targets from that particular base. i want to bring in two folks here at the pentagon chris lawrence also michael holmes from cnn international. chris, it's not a total surprise that this was there in saudi arabia, but certainly it was not something that they officially wanted to reveal. why are they doing it now? >> that's the big question, suzanne, why did this come out? we reported two years ago from our sources u.s. officials were telling us the cia was building an airstrip in the a arabian peninsula. it was hinted it would possibly be in saudi arabia. but we never had any sort of agreement to withhold that. we simply reported it was being built in the arabian peninsula. others entered an agreement with the white house to hold back the exact location. why that is coming out now? that's what we are trying to figure out. it's certainly extremely provocative. you couldn't pick probably a more provocative place in the islamic world to have u.s. strikes originating from saudi arabia. it is for that reason u.s. troops on saudi s
the u.s. mission in benghazi is our topic. testimony on capitol hill has ignited a fresh round of debate today. what's not going away are questions about last year's terror attack in libya after panetta's final testimony yesterday. >> if i were a family member and one of my loved ones was killed in benghazi, i would be sick to my stomach. >> republican lindsey graham declared on twitter the president, quote, has to announce for his leadership on benghazi after panetta and general martin dempsey testified, they spoke to the president only once during the eight-hour attack. >> one time. >> right. >> you talked to him how many times? >> the same one time. >> graham and his republican colleagues repeatedly pressed panetta on why there was no direct follow up with mr. obama after they met in the oval office. >> are you surprised that the president of the united states never called you, secretary penta, and said how is it going? >> normally in these situations -- >> did he know the level of threat? >> let me wa finish the answer. we -- we were deploying the forces. he was being kept up to date
is members of al qaeda in the arabian peninsula, which saudi arabia has long been working with the u.s. to fight. the pace of drone strikes has been growing rapidly in recent years. american officials said the first time the cia used the base was to kill this man, and wore out milwaukee kill thuis -- to kil this man. \ supporters say strikes like this have seriously damaged out kind of costs -- damaged al qaeda possibility to plan a tax, but others say they alienate local populations. brennan will have to answer questions in his confirmation hearing as cia director. the legality of drone strikes is likely to be high on the agenda, especially after a memo was leaked. white house 3 did the white house defended the policy. >> we have a knowledge there are sometimes we use remotely piloted aircraft against terrorists and to prevent attacks on the united states and to save american lives. we conduct the strikes because they are necessary to prevent threats, to stop future attacks, and save american lives. these attacks are ethical and wires. >> the fact there is a secret base may mean some
. 360,000 for the week. we're just kicking off right now. the u.s. government issues a new warning for anyone who tries to hack our computer system. this is a big deal. we'll talk about that in a moment. martha: you've heard about this looming automatic spending cuts coming down the pipeline. one week from today they're supposed to kick in. how tough is it really to cut 2 1/2% of the budget? could you pull that off? could you cut 2 1/2% from the hemmer budget? bill: i could, yeah, this afternoon. president obama is talking about his round of golf with tiger wood for the first time now. this is from 2009, this picture. of a the white house took heat for shutting out the white house press corps. did you hear tiger. >> he hit the ball well and got amazing touch. he can certainly chip-and-putt. if he ever spent, after these four years, if he spend more time playing the game of golf, i'm sure he can get to where he's a pretty good stick. new honey bunches of oats greek yogurt and whole grain. here we go. honey cornflakes and chunks of greek yogurt. i'm tasting both the yogurt and the ho
on its nuclear program. they say the nuclear fuel is for energy reactors. the u.s. is concerned that they will produce weapons grade material. let's head to the pits of the cme and phil flynn. >> very little reaction down here. the very first place you want to look is the ti spread. it has spread out to the largest level of the year. it is possible that part of that could be this story. a lot of people did not hold out a lot of hope for the stocks. the direct talks with the u.s., they thought maybe something may come out of that. at least they were hopeful. the rejection, now that obviously looks like it will be off the table. these talks will not do a whole heck of a lot. this comes at a time where they are tightening sanctions even more on iran. we saw saudia arabia, and take if you cannot get enough supply, we will pump a little bit more. melissa: that u.s. productivity fell 2% in the fourth quarter to its lowest level in nearly two years. what does the next day to say about our economic recovery? what do you make of that productivity number? that jumped out at me. >> the mov
house just fine drone strikes on u.s. citizens overseas. nbc news reported on the memo monday night and it has gotten lots of reaction in washington. what are your thoughts? call -- we want to get your thoughts on social media as well on twitter or facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get your thoughts in a moment. first, josh gerstein is joining us on the phone. here's your headline -- what was this memo? guest: this is a white paper that looks like it was derived from some confidential legal opinions that the opinions -- opinions that the justice department wrote that authorized drones or some other counter-terrorism operations to basically killed u.s. citizens overseas. and it talks about one set of circumstances. it looks like it is talking specifically about a particular country or type of country or certain type of leaders or terrorist organizations and under what conditions it would be ok to use this type of lethal force. it does not talk about drones per say, but it appears that is what they are referring to. if it does not rule out using its under other circumstances. it
regular mail on saturdays, that's it. at least come august. the head of the u.s. postal service says that will be the new normal starting at the end of the summer. officials tell us the agency is losing $25 million a day. it had to do something. here is what they say it will mean for all of us. you will not get first class mail like letters or birthday cards on saturdays. you will still get packages, priority mail, express mail and medicine. post offices now open on saturdays will be open on saturdays but po boxes will still get regular mail on saturdays. the post master general says his research shows 70% of americans are okay with this. >> the choice is either change some of the service or raise prices. and people don't want prices raised will make the changes in service. >> but the head of the letter carrier's union calls this a disastrous idea that will hurt millions of customers it would be particularly harmful to small businesses, rural communities, the elderly, the disabled and others who depend on saturday delivery for commerce and communication. gerri willis from the fox bus
:00 in new york city, big changes are on the way for the u.s. postal service affecting every american who gets mail. the agency today announced it will stop some of its saturday deliveries as it tries to stem the losses of some 25 million dollars per day, per day. under the new plan set to take effect in august, the postal service will no longer deliver letters and first class mail on saturdays, but it will still deliver packages plus priority mail, express mail, and mail order medicine, everything that makes money. it would not close any branches currently open on the weekends. of course, the cuts in service mean fewer jobs. steve sensteve steve centanni. >> reporter: vermont independent bernie sanders said this will send the post office into a death spiral. white house press secretary jay carney received to prefer a more comprehensive approach to postal reform. >> it would be our preference that that package of reforms be implemented for the sake of a stronger future of the postal service. we're looking at this particular action now and, you know, i can't really evaluate it yet since we
. the accidental burning of the koran that started a wave of violence that included the killing of u.s. troops. and the massacre of 16 civilians in a shooting rampage allegedly at the hands of an american soldier. >> we have a casualty. >> reporter: general allen fought back tears when he said more than 560 coalition forces were killed on his watch, the vast majority american. >> we acknowledge that there is a chair at a table at home, a chair that is empty and will always be. and we can never forget them. and they are in our prayers always. >> reporter: as general allen says his final good-byes here in afghanistan, what no one knows is whether general dunford will one day be holding his own handover ceremony or whether he will be the united states last commander in afghanistan. there's still plenty to do, before the end of 2014 general dunford will have to wind down america's longest war, bring home most of the remaining u.s. forces and staggering amount of equipment while handing the fight against the-- taliban over to afghan security forces. charlie d'agata cbs news kabul. >> jeff: as ameri
to undertake a better prepare for defense against a threat to u.s. territory because of this coming capability, i think china is going to say that's unacceptable. i'm hopeful. but at the end of the day as i say, the united states can't sit there waiting just for china. we have to work with our allies on a comprehensive strategy, again trying to let the region know that we want to be that important security guarantor. we also want to be a major trader, an investor to the region and with asia-pacific. and for the stability and the trade and investment, for prosperity and liberty to take root in this century, in a dynamic century with a rising asia pacific, it's going to have to take greater stability than north korea is right now letting it have. so with those initial comment, i'll turn it back to our chairman. >> well, thank you, patrick. as always, very comprehensive argument. now, the floor is open. before we open the floor -- [inaudible] >> i want to pick up on patrick's point, and elaborate on what i see as the elephant in the room, which is china. outgoing defense secretary panetta told th
't giving up yet. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." cutting our pay. that's how one u.s. officer says u.s. troops view the recommendation for a smaller pay increase in 2014. no one goes into the military to get rich but most servicemen and women need every dollar in their paycheck. so worried that next paycheck may be smaller is not going over well among the troops. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr has the details. she's working the story. barbara, what's going on? >> wolf, in this town, there's nothing that causes more anxiety in budget politics than the concept of cutting the pay for the troops. but that is exactly what is on the table if congress and the president cannot reach an agreement on a spending plan. the troops usually are happy to see defense secretary leon panetta, smiles and handshakes all around. but days before he leaves office, panetta has bad news. he's proposing less money in their paycheck next year. panetta, a savvy washington operative in budget politics, is leaving it to congress to figure out how not to cut pay and keep thousands of defen
to go. >> any member of al qaeda, a u.s. citizen or not, needs to know they have the ability to surrender anytime, anywhere throughout the world, and they can do so before their organization is to strike. we will destroy that organization, and u.s. citizens can surrender anytime. >> just on that point, i do not take a back seat to anybody in terms of citing al qaeda. i asked you a different question, and on the question of what kind of evidence ought to be applied, whether there ought to be geographic limits, the question of whether an individual should be allowed to surrender. for example, there is a question of whether the obligation changes, a valid target has not been publicly reported, so there are issues here, and i think we are going to have to continue discussions, and, madam, i look forward to the extra round. >> senator coats. >> i think it may be better held for further discussion next week in the classified room, but this whole idea of leaks, nothing upsets me more in this committee, and we have had a lot of these in the last few years, to see something that was d
at sigtarp and was also at the u.s. securities and exchange commission who -- and served as counsel to mary schapiro and christopher cox. and investigative financial fraud, insider trading and other violations of securities law. she spent time as a litigator. her jd is from brigham young law school and she went to school here, old dominion university. the special inspector general from tarp and a recent report. treasury continues approving excessive -- excessive pay. on twitter -- is this all hindsight? guest: it is interesting. one of the things we constantly report on is things that should have been done better. you have to respect that a lot of decisions were made with a sense of urgency. but the compensation decisions were not. there was plenty of time to set up a good system for that. and even for the discount -- for the decisions that were made in a rush, it is really important we point out how things could have been done better. let's say we get and the situation where there is another crisis. and treasury and the regulators are running around with a sense of courtesy in an emergency
and u.s. secretary of state governor bush appointed the secretary of state of florida from 2005 to 2007. she has taught at ford service institute as the co-chair of the u.s. the part of state mandatory seminar for the newly appointed ambassadors and in an interesting twist she spoke at stanford university where secretary rice is a very distinguished member of the faculty and former provost and the university of miami school of law. she was the u.s. ambassador to the republic of iceland during the administration of george h. w. bush and during the ronald reagan administration he served as the under secretary and assistant secretary at the u.s. department of commerce where he was responsible for trade, development, export, and international travel and tourism and he was appointed by the florida governor jeb bush and charlie crist to serve on the statewide board. both sue and chuck serve on the board of directors of the council of american ambassadors. she's a deval graduate of stanford while we can't claim him as an ally, he's a longtime member and past chairman of the board of the univer
point to a different reality. economic mobility in the u.s. is low compared to what it was in times past and with current levels in many european countries in canada. you hear all about rags to riches stories, but they are the exceptions. a comprehensive study by the pew economic mobility documents that in the u.s. today few poor people become even upper middle class. now, some of the criticism of president obama's program has come from people who worry about the government's track record in the area of early childhood education. they point to head start, the long-standing program that provides this education to disadvantaged children. the department of health and human services released a study of head start in 2010 which was updated in 2012 that positive effects begin to fade in a few years. this has led many to call the program a failure and urged the government not to throw good money after bad. people are jumping to conclusions about a very complicated subject without understanding the study or social science research. three scholars from the university of chicago and university of
that is the biggest window. that is not over populated by u.s. capacity and capability. it is not religious. it is a it is not religious. we can extend it as needed. it should make us be more urgent. we find that when we bring urgency to almost any discussion inside of the u.s. government is a constructive thing to do. >> there are a number of areas in the u.s. government that look at failed and failing state. the undersecretary for political affairs has that responsibility. dns see used to chair and -- the nsc used to chair a committee. how does cso play into this? >> we try to work with everyone that you mentioned. we want to be aggregators of talent and good work that has gone on. for example, something as simple as analytics, we have a metadata analyst in our shop now, but we want him to be an aggregator of aggregators. i keep saying you have to be made silver on steroids -- nate silver on steroids. we cannot run enough staff to review and it turns out the intelligence community loves being called by the state department. they are flattered by it. they want their wo
political contributor the democratic strategist hilary rosen and the former u.s. senator from minnesota and former romney foreign policy adviser norm coleman. guys, thanks very much for coming in. the speaker just met with reporters on the hill. i'll play a little clip. this was his message. >> listen, hope springs eternal. the president can sit down with harry reid tonight and work with senate democrats who have the majority in the senate to move a bill. it's time for them to act. i've made this clear for months now. and yet we've seen nothing. >> now, he wants them, senator, to move legislation that passed in the last congress. the last congress is irrelevant right now. you need new legislation in order to pass a bill. >> wolf, what's not irrelevant is last congress we had the tax increase. so now it's spending cut time. the president doesn't want to to the spending cut. we had the tax increase -- >> right now, to avert this fiscal crisis we have right now, these forced spending cuts, you need a new bill. you can't use a bill from the old congress. >> the president -- you know what, a
:00 eastern and our companion network, c-span. the u.s. senate is not in today as democrats and republicans continue their policy retreat. lawmakers will return tomorrow at 9:30 a.m. to continue work on a bill to reauthorize and the violence against women act. you can see this and that live here on c-span2. the u.s. house is in session. members passed a bill requiring president obama to submit a balanced budget to congress. the vote was 253-167. the house is done with less with a work for the wheat. members will be out the next couple of days. democratic members can attend their retreat. follow live on c-span when members return next week. coming up, live as a group of republican national security leaders from the house and senate armed services committee holds a press briefing to discuss averting defense sequestration. live coverage at 145 eastern here on c-span2. until then, yesterday a bipartisan group of house members introduced a new bill that would make gun trafficking a federal crime. that would also penalize straw purchasers who buy guns for convicted felons are prohibited from buyi
'm looking forward to working with the ranking member ron barber as we both share a strong commitment to u.s. border security and ensuring our border agents receive the support that they need to protect the homeland. last september, ron and i attended the dedication ceremony of the bryant a kerry border patrol station in arizona on wrangled patrol agent brian terry who was killed in december 2010 in the line of duty in arizona. also look forward to a strong bipartisan cooperation in helping to make the department of homeland security as efficient and effective as possible. i would also like to introduce our new freshman majority members. today we have mr. kief rothfuss from pennsylvania and mr. richard hudson of north carolina, and later joining us will be mr. steven gaines of montana. they bring a wealth of experience to their new roles in the congress and on the subcommittee at a look forward to leveraging their experience and knowledge to provide effective oversight of dhs. let me pause for just a minute and think the subcommittee staff who have worked diligently to put this first hearing
the economy. we need to spend money to exist. in the u.s., you just cannot stop spending money. if you do, it will be the end of us. these people are haters. they are not going to change the way they think. thank god there are enough people in this country who think progressively. maybe we can turn this economy around and help america. have a nice day. host: robert brings up the sequestration. we will talk about that later with ray locker of "usa today." he will talk about the sequestration's effect on defense spending. that will be and about 25 minutes. we want to show you more of the president's speech four years ago and elkhart, indiana where he can each -- pitched his economic plan. he talks about the people who have lost their livelihood. [video clip]>> nearly 600,000 in the past month alone. when we say that this area has lost jobs faster than anywhere else in the united states of america, with an unemployment rate of over national security editor $1.2 trillion% when it was 4.7% just last year. we talk about layoffs in companies like keystone rv. companies that have sustained this
the circumstances in which such force is directed against u.s. citizens and non- citizens alike. i have been attempting to speak publicly about the very low number of civilian casualties that result from such strikes. but for the past several years, this committee has done significant oversight of the government's knowledge of targeted strikes, and the figures we have obtained from the executive branch, which we have done have confirmed that the number of civilian casualties that have resulted from such strikes each year has typically been in the single digits. when i asked to give out the actual numbers, i am told you cannot, and i say why not? because it is classified. it is a covert program. for the public, it does not exist. well, i think that rationale, mr. brennan, is long gone, and i will talk to you about that because i think it is very important that we share this data with people. this committee will continue to perform significant oversight of targeted strikes. we received this morning and office of legal counsel opinion on the topic. actually, we received a short one and a long o
for the world innovation. they are a big part of why the u.s. remains the destination for the world's best and brightest. investment in education leads to innovation, which leads to more opportunity and jobs for all. our problem? the investment we make is not yielding maximum returns. each year our colleges and universities graduate approximately 40,000 foreign nationals with masters and ph.d degrees, many of whom are then forced to leave the kanji because there are not enough visa slots in the immigration system to permit them to stay. so rather than being able to invent things here in america, grow businesses or start one of their own, they do all these things somewhere else. now, fiona zhou is here with us today. she is earning her master's at gw school of engineering and applied science. originally from china, she's been india united states for five years, studying operations research and the systems engineering department. if you talk to her you will see, she's pretty smart. she would like to stay here. she wants to invest her talents in america, and maybe even start her own company.
. howard, will you dot honors? [applause] >> u.s. senator, vice president of the united states, nobel peace prize recipient, as cor winner, best selling author, any one of these superlatives alone would be enough to suggest that our next speaker is a force with which to be reckoned, but when combined into one individual, it is evident that al gore is a force of nature. he is always been on the leading edge of promoting the internet as a tool for greater communication, of climate change as one of the greatest perils of our time, and in his latest book, "the future," of the key medical technological, and philosophical drivers checking our world. ever the big picture thinker, al gore explores how we may harness these epic change agents for the good. although his public professionalized had it not been without controversy, his record of accomplishments speak to the life lived on the precipice of passion, purpose, and possibility. on behalf of the savannah book festival, it is by great honor to introduce to all of you al gore. [applause] [cheers and applause] >> thank you very much, thank you. t
agencies and what not. and this may surprise you but not all parts of the u.s. government work together seamlessly. [laughter] so here we are, as this cycle and we have these things, what we call blinks between the parts and so one element would find a target but by the time the information got to the people who were going to fix it usually with a predator or something like that to make sure they're there then, time would have passed and accuracy of information, fidelity would have passed. then it would be passed over to the raid force. again you have a loss. like the game telephone where you whisper around the room, it is untellable by the fifth person we're trying to do things in that system. we said this is madness. it won't work. we went on a campaign to fix that process, bringing in different parts of the organization, building intelligence capacity. giving ourselves a mind-set that was different before. if each element did its part of the process they could take pride, we succeeded, we did what we were told. we wiped that clean, nobody is successful unless the whole process works.
in the 20th century, the u.s. was at war virtually every decade of the 20th century, so if we think of ourselves as peaceful country that does not engage in war, we need to rethink that. >> that is right. david, i want to ask this question, because where we were before and boots on the ground, the sense of the collective experience of war was quite different. we were looking at the numbers of military troops versus civilian americans not engaged and it is less than 1% of the u.s. population that is doing the fighting, and now with technology and drones, it, part of it why perpetual war seems possible because there is little cost to the vast majority of us. >> well, if we had a universal draft and in 1994 two-thirds of the class of princeton was drafted. that is a huge check on the politicians, and the policies that we are are following with drones are infuriating people because other people get killed and innocent people killed along the way, which raises in your question that you are raising future conflicts, and the anger that, imagine if somebody was using a drone here and killed
korea. why were they part of the axis of the evil? so a chance we had to improve the u.s. and iranian relationship was really undermined with that speech, and we've been going over this past ten years and in 2002 you get the iraq war, one of the two american war the united states failed to engage in in the past decade. obama unfortunately comes in with very little background in foreign policy never paid attention to it, served in washington for two years and was a into a sestak supporter but those that new national security could be a problem when he appointed the secretary of state for domestic reasons the secretary of defense for domestic reasons and appointed a retired marine general to be the national security adviser he lasted a lot a year but leon panetta and i know he's one of your neighbors in california she was captured by the operation mentality of the cia before he'd been in the building more than a month this was a national security team obama also was by the military that's how you got the surge of the forces i think he realizes he had by the military and that is importan
are you doing. >> greta: very well. dominic, tell the viewers who the doctor is and what he did for the u.s.? >> the pakistani doctor who helped the cia verify the location of bin laden and his compound in pakistan. he basically ran a hepatitis vaccination program set up by the cia and went to the compound under the pretext of vaccinating. and the calls to the compound to set up the visits were copied or traced by the cia and they've got a voice print of bin laden's personal courier and they knew they were on to the al-qaeda leader. >> and so our navy seals go in and take out usama bin laden and leave behind the doctor and he's arrested by the pakistanis, isi, thrown in prison and tried for treason and 30, 35 years. and have we done anything to get him back or to help free him? >> the efforts to get the doctor out have been very weak, quite frankly, on this side of the u.s. government, both at the cia level and also the state department in an effort-- in its efforts as well and one of the reasons, the u.s. government is very, very scared when it comes to dealing with the pakistanis, because
timothy dolan, the head of u.s. conference of bishops. he spoke to reporters before he left for rome. >> on thursday we will with him for a while. that i look forward to. that will drive him home literally, to say good-bye. then i think it will begin to sink in that what are we here for? that is going to be awesome. martha: always very plain spoken. cardinal timothy dolan expressing his enthusiasm for what lies ahead of him as he heads to rome. they will begin the meetings on monday we are told you about a spokesman for the vatican says there is no way of knowing how long they will want to meet before they set the date for the conclave to begin. so we're still a few steps to go in this whole process as we get closer. bill: my bet they will move fast but we'll see. it is their call. the conclave is the assembly of cardinals who will pick benedict's successor. 11 american cardinals among the electors in the conclave. the prime meaning from latin, any place a room that could be locked with a key we hear. the cardinals will go to the sistine chapel twice a day to vote. only cardinals und
stewart is not surprised, take a look. >> the u.s. postal service says delivering the mail on saturdays must stop if they are to survive. >> the postal service hopes the cuts will help it save some $2 billion annually after losing nearly $16 billion last year. >> wow. i can't believe the business model of transporting letters with vehicles across the country for 40 cents a pop is failing. so where do you want me to take that, hawaii? no, no trouble, i'll put out a plane and get it there in two days. you got a quarter? yeah i'll do it for a quarter. yeah, [ bleep ] it, i'll just do it. >>> everybody's excited for the snow. poor bill has to work all day tomorrow. his son william's birthday. >> maybe you can replace me, go to his birthday party for me. >> i'll be happy to do that. how many inches in new york? >> i'm going for 6 to 8, weather service is going for 12. >> bundle up. still ahead, texts and e-mails are next. "morning joe" is now just moments away. officemax is celebrating our new collaboration with go daddy! with an online package including: domain name, website bu
. i will say it. >>> welcome back to "press: here." the u.s. post office recently declared it would no longer deliver mail on saturdays but was quick to say it would continue to deliver packages. you may be getting fewer letters because of the internet, but apparently you're getting more boxes shipped to your house. and, again, that's probably because of the internet. online shopping has taken another step forward beyond ebay and amazon with the advent of the tablet and electronic catalogs. this one is called coffee table and it mixes big retailers together. retailers like hellsburgs and lands' end and l.l. bean. ben choi is the ceo of coffee table. he's also venture capitalist running mavron capital with starbucks' founder howard schulz and spent time at the cia's silicon value chee capital arm but left just before his secret clearance was complete. we should ask about that later, comrade. but in the meantime, in the last segment i carefully said i really like peoria. you're from peoria. >> you're in range. born and raised in peoria. that's what the cia told you. >> that's your cov
government in massachusetts. nearly 30 years as a u.s. senator. the only committee that he served on from the day he became a senator, until its last day in the center of the foreign relations committee. he grew up with a father in the foreign service. it is a family calling. i will count it as a joy but as a bittersweet sadness that my service in the senate, i got to serve with him on the foreign relations committee for one week. [laughter] i am the junior senator on that committee. i sit far out on the wing on that committee. it was the first committee vote i cast was to confirm him as the new secretary. senator, you are coming to a place that believes deeply in the values that you share, as robert mentioned. president jefferson strongly believed in the connection of this wonderful exemplary nations to a world community. we have been a global leader. i always like to think about the global leadership that tries to balance military strength. secretary kerry knows the importance and limits of that spirit diplomatic strength, the strength of our economy, the strength of our moral example,
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